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Archive for September, 2009

There appear to be no end to expensive expenses in the production budget… here is another round of “favourites”:

11. Lots of Set-Ups – There could be two reasons why there are lots of set-ups: either you have multiple cameras running (so there are extra expenses in labour and equipment, and more time to choreograph it all, plus more editing time to sift through the footage); or you have lots of coverage and camera moves planned (so you are not capturing much of the script as you move the camera around for all that coverage, and need more shoot days). Either reason is expensive!

12. Lots of Unit Moves – Not only do you have more costs associated with location rental and management, but you are spending precious daylight hours in vehicles moving from place to place instead of capturing images.

13. Name Stars – Their salaries are obviously high, but what about the extra costs? Do you have fly in their entourage? Send them home every weekend? Do they want a car for themselves, separate from their car and driver on the set? Will they only work for a certain number of hours? Does their limited schedule on your set force you to schedule around them? And yet, aren’t they so worth it? Oh yeah.

14. Weather-Dependant Scenes – Waiting for makeup and hair to be completed is one thing, but to have a whole cast and crew wait around for clouds to clear (or to arrive) feels really silly, and you can feel the money being spent. If you can help it, do not get caught with unfilmed exteriors at the end of your shoot.

15. Rush Hour, Hockey Season & Other Fun Times – There are times when a downtown street cannot be locked, or a hockey rink cannot be closed, for filming. In some cases, you can pay the premium to secure what you need for these “fun times”, but that’s expensive. Typically, instead, you have to schedule around these “fun times” and find yourself locked into shooting on weekends or at night (expensive item #3).

Happy budgeting!

Cheers,
Deb

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So, it appears I have travelled virtually through my books to more countries than I have gone in person! How cool!

Between “Production Management 101” and “Surviving Production“, my books are in bookstores and libraries in at least 20 countries, including: Australia, Canada, China, Germany, Greece, Israel, Italy, Japan, Lebanon, Morocco, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, UK, and the USA! I especially love the Amazon Japan site – seeing my book in English whereas the rest of the screen text in Japanese.

Bit of a shame I don’t have any travel memories from this virtual travel. I guess I’ve got a few plane rides to catch in order to catch up…

Cheers,
Deb

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[Her publisher declares Joan to be a world-class hopeless romantic…]
“No. Hopeful. Hopeful romantic.”
  – Joan Wilder (Romancing The Stone – 1984)

Yes, Joan shows us we need to hang on to hope in life, but she also shows us that we need to live our lives to the fullest and not just wait around for our dreams to come true. Life’s adventure has taught Joan to blossom out of the shy author she was and to become the best Joan she can be – even without the one man that she dreams of sharing life with. And while she’s living, it’s not an empty existance… she still has hope. May we all hang on to and never lose that hope.

Cheers,
Deb

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Unique festival opening shots?

As festival season is about to begin, I can’t help but remember back to one of the first times I attended TIFF. I only managed to see nine films that year, but oddly, three of those nine films started with the same opening shot. Yup. Thee completely different films in three different languages and from three totally different countries from around the world came up with:

Fade in to full frame water. Camera pulls out and boat enters shot. Protagonist is on bow of boat. Camera moves in to Protagonist.

Just think. Three different directors in three different countries all thought they came up with an original way to open their respective movies. It goes to show then, doesn’t it? Whatever we think of creatively, it’s probably been done before.

Cheers,
Deb

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